Q&A: Retirement Savings

Dear Liz: I am changing jobs because of a layoff. I contributed to my former employer's 401(k) to the extent possible. My new employer also offers a 401(k), but I won't be eligible for a year.

I want to use an IRA in the meantime. I do not understand how I should answer the question on the tax form about whether my employer offers a retirement plan when I am determining how much of my IRA contribution I can deduct. My employer does, obviously, but I can't participate yet. Advice, please?

Answer: You're smart to continue your retirement savings while you wait to become eligible for the new employer's 401(k). Missing even one year of contributions could cost you tens of thousands of dollars in lost retirement income.

When you're not covered by an employer plan, all of your contribution to an IRA is typically deductible.

When you are covered, your contribution's deductibility is subject to income limits. In 2015, the ability to deduct an IRA contribution phases out between modified adjusted gross incomes of $61,000 to $71,000 for singles and $98,000 to $118,000 for married couples filing jointly.

To be considered covered by an employer plan, you have to be an active participant, said Mark Luscombe, principal analyst for Wolters Kluwer Tax & Accounting. That means money has to be put into your account by you or your employer or both.

Here's the twist: You're considered covered for the whole tax year if you participated in a plan during any part of that year. So the IRS will consider you an active participant for 2015 because you were contributing to your former employer's plan for part of this year.

If you start contributing to your new employer's plan when you become eligible next year, you'll be considered covered for 2016 as well.

You could decide not to contribute to the new employer's plan until 2017 to preserve your IRA's deductibility, but it probably makes more sense to start contributing to the new plan to get both the tax break and any match.

If your contribution to an IRA isn't deductible, consider making a contribution to a Roth IRA instead.

In retirement, withdrawals from a regular IRA will be subject to income taxes while withdrawals from a Roth IRA will be tax free. In 2015, your ability to contribute to a Roth phases out between modified gross incomes of $116,000 to $131,000 if you're single and $183,000 to $193,000 if you're married.

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